Vote for Community Impact Award at the Charity Bank Impact Awards 2018

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The Impact Awards are back! It's your opportunity to vote in the Community Impact Award which recognises Charity Bank borrowers that have made a significant positive impact on their local community or the community they serve through the work they do.

In 1973, several members of the Leicester community decided to act in the face of rising numbers of homeless people in the city. They opened a small night shelter, and Action Homeless was born.

The charity has gradually grown its activities, tackling homelessness and its causes over the past 45 years. Now it operates throughout the city and is committed to improving the lives of those affected by homelessness in the long term.

Building on its roots providing crisis accommodation, Action Homeless opened further hostels and temporary accommodation. These not only provide shelter but also offer a range of support services to address the associated issues – such as substance misuse, mental health problems and social exclusion – that contribute to homelessness. Read more.

We use Survey Monkey to record votes, view its privacy policy here. View the Impact Award voting terms and conditions.

Green Energy Mull (GEM) was formed by Mull and Iona Community Trust in 2012 from a community-led initiative to investigate renewable energy options on the island. After commissioning a feasibility study and options appraisal, hydroelectric energy was identified as the best option, and a site at Garmony on the Isle of Mull was chosen.

As an Industrial and Provident Society operating as a Community Benefit Company, all of GEM’s assets and income are used for the benefit of the community.

Despite several complex challenges, particularly with securing a firm grid connection, GEM managed to complete the scheme on schedule and Garmony Hydro was commissioned in June 2015. Read more.

We use Survey Monkey to record votes, view its privacy policy here. View the Impact Award voting terms and conditions.

Gwesty Seren is a social enterprise that operates as a standalone, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Seren Ffestiniog Cyf charity group. Seren was established 21 years ago with the purpose of supporting people with learning disabilities to live, work, socialise and integrate into the local community. It also organises holidays twice a year for the local people it works with. Time and time again it came up against difficulties with accommodation that had claimed to be fully accessible.

In 2010, the Community Asset Transfer Fund initiative was set up in Wales, which coincided with the sale of a Gwynedd County Council care home. The idea to create hotel accommodation designed with people of all disabilities in mind was born, and Gwesty Seren (meaning Hotel Star in Welsh) was established. Read more.

We use Survey Monkey to record votes, view its privacy policy here. View the Impact Award voting terms and conditions.

In the early 1980s, the UK’s first commercial whale watching operation was set up on the Isle of Mull to fund research about the animals. This was the beginning of what has since become a large-scale research, education and community outreach organisation championing the importance of the west coast of Scotland as an area for marine life.

In 1994, HWDT in its current form was founded from this initial endeavour and has continued to grow and extend its reach ever since. It now employs 11 full time equivalent staff and encourages the involvement of members of the public from across the area and the globe.

HWDT supports the remote communities of the Scottish west coast and islands to learn about and mindfully engage with local marine life. A Discovery Centre on the Isle of Mull offers a space to discover and learn, and roadshows across the islands have taken the important work of the HWDT to the most remote locations. Read more.

We use Survey Monkey to record votes, view its privacy policy here. View the Impact Award voting terms and conditions.

In January 2009, the Parish Council in the Lyvennet Valley area carried out a community and housing needs survey which identified a lack of affordable housing as a pressing issue. A community-led organisation of 11 volunteers was formed to tackle this issue, comprising of county, district and parish councillors as well as other interested representatives of the community.

By summer of the same year, the Lyvennet Community Trust (LCT) was incorporated as a company limited by guarantee and went on to become a registered charity, with the main aim of providing Social Housing and associated amenities within the community for those in need by reason of financial hardship. Read more.

We use Survey Monkey to record votes, view its privacy policy here. View the Impact Award voting terms and conditions.

The Young Women’s Housing Project (YWHP) began in 1988 as an offshoot of the Sheffield Rape Crisis Service after they noted an increase in referrals of girls and young women where the initial need was safe and secure housing, often as result of sexual abuse at home.

The Local Council provided funding to run a two-bed flat that could act as accommodation for this primary purpose and the YWHP was born. Since then, it has steadily grown and developed its mission to provide not only a safe place to live but emotional support and practical help to young women who have been affected by sexual abuse and exploitation. Read more.

We use Survey Monkey to record votes, view its privacy policy here. View the Impact Award voting terms and conditions.